Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Batteries, Chargers, and Battery Management Systems.
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BDamari   10 mW

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Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Post by BDamari » Mar 11 2020 5:17am

In Richard Lloyd's video about the SPIM08HP lipo cells, he tests them on his car to see if they can start it.
Link to the video: https://youtu.be/Gw9f68gN_s4
During the first few tests on a CCA meter, it showed a maximum of 350-400 amps (at minute 13:00). But after starting his car with the same battery for around 10 times, he tests it again on the CCA meter and gets 600-800 (20:00).
I do recall some thread saying that new batteries have a higher internal resistance than what their datasheet says, but after the first few cycles, it goes down to the rated IR number.
Is this true?

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dogman dan   100 GW

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Re: Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Post by dogman dan » Mar 11 2020 5:38am

I bet he just warmed up the batteries, which does affect performance.

Break in is usually just a matter of a cycle or two, which gets it to take its full charge. I find a battery that sits all winter, can behave this way too. Likely more a matter of the pack balancing than anything else.

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flippy   1 MW

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Re: Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Post by flippy » Mar 11 2020 8:37am

its temperature in this case.
using a battery like that for cranking a car causes the battery to heat up, and that lowers the IR wich improves performance.
Lithium beats liquid dinosaurs.

john61ct   100 GW

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Re: Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Post by john61ct » Mar 11 2020 8:49am

Most don't, and the "need" to does vary by battery type and use case.

If brand new OTS, not a bad idea to set a precise capacity benchmark test, to compare to later as the pack wears.

If you do it before any use

then again after say 20 cycles, you may well see a capacity **increase**, up to 15% or so.

Obviously use the highest result as your benchmark for 100% SoH.

"They say" keeping the C-rate low both charging and usage for that initial period may help extend lifespan.

But I usually only see that in gentler use case contexts

the "abusive" usage patterns inherent in propulsion may negate any such benefit.

Have not seen formal testing to support either way.

john61ct   100 GW

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Re: Do you need to "break-in" your batteries?

Post by john61ct » Mar 11 2020 8:51am

And yes of course temperature has a big impact, try for consistency in such benchmarking tests.

They are usually done at 0.4C or lower, say a 2-3 hour rate.

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flippy   1 MW

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Re: Do you need to

Post by flippy » Mar 12 2020 8:38am

john61ct wrote:
Mar 11 2020 8:49am
Have not seen formal testing to support either way.
my testing shows that most cells increase in capacity a few percent after the first few charges but lose them pretty much a few cycles later.
Lithium beats liquid dinosaurs.

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